new media

Mimi Ito: The Positive Potential of Peer Pressure and Messing Around Online

from DMLResearch Hub’s YouTube Channel:

This past October, Ito spoke at the New School’s biennial conference series, The Politics of Digital Culture. In her talk, “Learning with Social and Mobile Media: The Positive Potential of Peer Pressure and Messing Around Online”, she examines the diversity of youth experience with new media and how it relates to questions of equity, access, and learning opportunities.

“We can debate outcomes of engagement all we want, but the thing that’s really important, I think, to have on the public agenda is really the question of ‘Who is getting access to the kinds of experiences that are productive and engaging, and who is not?’ And what are the factors contributing to that?”

Two News Posts at Libraries and Transliteracy

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Learn About New Media Practices for the Classroom and Library @ Libraries and Transliteracy

Check out my latest post chock full of some powerful and practical resources to inform your practice as a librarian or classroom teacher for integrating new media practices into your instruction over at our Libraries and Transliteracy blog! If you have not done so already, please add the Libraries and Transliteracy blog to your favorite RSS aggregator.

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TEDxNYED: Examining the Role of New Media and Technology in Shaping the Future of Education

http://www.tedxnyed.com/

TEDxNYED: Independently organized TED event via kwout

Today is the day of TEDxNYED; if you miss the livestream of the outstanding lineup of speakers, be of good cheer:  all video will be available on the TEDxNYED website and their YouTube Channel.

What is TEDxNYED?

TEDxNYED, an all-day conference examining the role of new media and technology in shaping the future of education, will take place in New York City on Saturday, March 6, 2010 and will be webcast live here at tedxnyed.com, allowing viewers around the world to join and engage in these ideas worth spreading.

TEDxNYED is operating under license from TED, organizers of the immensely popular TED Conference, an annual event where some of the world’s leading thinkers and doers are invited to share what they are most passionate about. In the spirit of “ideas worth spreading,” TED has created TEDx, a program of local, organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. ted.com/tedx.

TEDxNYED is independently organized by New York educators. At TEDxNYED, TED Talk videos and live speakers will combine to spark deep discussion and connections. TEDxNYED presenters have been invited to share their insights and inspire conversations about the future of education. Attendees of the conference will participate via networking sessions where they will educate one another and, in the spirit of TED, help spread these ideas.

TEDxNYED is an all-day event designed to bring leading educators, innovators, and idealists together to share their vision of education. This event will provide a platform for administrators, teachers, and those passionate about education to connect, learn from these extraordinary speakers, and spread their ideas on how new media and technology are shaping the future of education. There will be live speakers, two recorded TED Talks, and a number of networking sessions both during and after the event

The lineup of speakers features some of the most innovative and forward-thinking minds in a broad range of fields that are impacting current thought in education as well as librarianship!  Henry Jenkins, Michael Wesch, Andy Carvin, Chris Lehmann, and Lawrence Lessig are just a few of the stellar speakers.

Here are a few helpful links:

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Q&A with Clay Shirky on Twitter and Iran

This resource just came in via my Facebook page:

http://blog.ted.com/2009/06/qa_with_clay_sh.php?utm_campaign=ted&utm_content=site-basic&utm_medium=on.ted.com-copypaste&utm_source=facebook.com

TED Blog: Q&A with Clay Shirky on Twitter and Iran via kwout

NYU professor Clay Shirky gave a fantastic talk on new media during our TED@State event earlier this month. He revealed how cellphones, the web, Facebook and Twitter had changed the rules of the game, allowing ordinary citizens extraordinary new powers to impact real-world events. As protests in Iran exploded over the weekend, we decided to rush out his talk, because it could hardly be more relevant. I caught up with Clay this afternoon to get his take on the significance of what is happening. HIs excitement was palpable.