Writing Around Text on Text Effort 2: Unplugged Conversations for Inquiry, Participation, and Social Construction of Meanings

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This past Friday, my fellow librarian Jennifer Lund and I had another opportunity to help facilitate written conversations about texts using the strategies we learned in the Harvey Daniels workshop we attended in December 2013.    Emily Russell, a teacher and Language Arts Department Chair we’ve collaborated with regularly this past year, and her students have been reading the memoir The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls.  When she came to us for ideas for helping students transact with the text and their peers, we shared some of the strategies from the Daniels workshop as well as the write around text on text strategy we did with Darryl Cicchetti.

One of our reflections from our work with Darryl is that we think it would helpful to scaffold the write around text on text strategy by first giving students the opportunity to do the “silent literature circle letters.”  In this strategy, students can work in pairs or small groups of 3-4 (no more than 4) to have a conversation about a text or question through timed letter writing.  You can begin by having students write silently for 3-4 minutes and then swapping letters ( which can be written on notebook paper or large index cards) and writing again for bursts of 3-4 minutes.   Depending on how many people are in a group, this could go back and forth between pairs or you could simply write around the small group until everyone had a chance to respond to each other.  This can then be followed-up with small group discussion about the ideas and points they wrote on paper before moving to a large group share.  Emily did this with her three classes at the beginning of the week before coming down to the media center on Friday to do the write around text on text.

On Thursday, students used the same template we used with Darryl’s classes to have students identify a passage that stood out to write2them as well as questions they had about that chunk of text.  Some students chose brief and specific  passages; others chose large extended sections spanning 2-3 pages.  Most students chose something in the middle about a paragraph or so in length.  At the end of each period, Emily sent those down to the media center along with a roster of groups she selected to help us organize for Friday.  Just as I did with Darryl, I made copies of the passages on colored paper and then affixed them to large sheets of butcher paper.  Because our copier machine has been broken for two weeks, I used the ScannerPro app and then exported the PDFs of the passages to Evernote for printing.  This process moved fairly quickly although it would have been faster if I had access to a printer configured for Airprint.  The other aspect that was different this time was using colored butcher paper—that had been my original intent for the first time with Darryl’s students, but because I didn’t specify colored paper, our library student helpers assumed I wanted white paper.  This time I was sure to go with them and to be specific about colors I wanted.  While that sounds like a minor point, Emily’s students immediately commented about the colors and that they liked that when they first entered the library on Friday.  One other thing I did differently out of necessity with time constraints that come with doing prep work for more sections—I simply wrote group names on butcher paper with a black Sharpie instead of making the pretty group nametags in PowerPoint that I did last time.

This time we met in our area of the library that has eight rectangular tables and a screen for project rather than the rotunda area we used with Darryl’s classes.  We felt this would help us get groups together more quickly and help us avoid dealing with the horrific acoustics that plague our rotunda area of the library (as in a whisper echoes loudly across the entire space—it is akin to being in a cave when you are trying to talk to someone in this part of our library, a problem we’re working to address or at least mitigate). write4 As Emily’s students arrived, she, Jennifer, and I instructed them to find their table by looking for their name on the butcher paper on the tables; we also had the group rosters up on a slide we projected onto a screen.   We reviewed the instructions for the write-around text on text, took time to answer any questions, and then instructed students to jump in as we told them we’d write for about 10-12 minutes, and we’d alert them when time was up.  Just as we did with Darryl’s classes, we circulated among the groups, observing, photographing, and videoing; we also answered any questions students had, and Emily also jumped in and actively participated in the written conversations with students as well.

In reality, each class actually wrote for 20 minutes!  Because they were so into what they were doing, we did not want to break the flow.  It was interesting to note some differences in how these students engaged in the activity compared to our first group with Darryl.

  • None of the classes seemed confused about the directions and immediately jumped into the activity.  Because we had the hindsight of offering this kind of scaffolding and had already seated the students by their groups, we think these steps helped minimize any confusion.
  • There was less oral conversation doing the write-around time (which Daniels advocates as silent writing time) and less socializing; when students did converse, it was done so in a quiet manner and was related specifically to the text or the activity.
  • Students were able to write for a longer sustained time period (roughly 20 minutes vs. 10 or so minutes).
  • Students wrote more responses directly to the text as well as to each other; we have not yet coded the responses for every group yet (this will take some time as there are approximately 25 groups total to code), but I suspect from what I read and saw Friday that we’ll see some different patterns in terms of response type, volume, and depth from our first group in December.
  • Students seemed very organic in their work—on their own, each class began drifting to other tables and seemed intentional in trying to make their way to every table at least once.  We did not tell them to do this; in fact, with Darryl’s students, we had asked them to focus just on their group (this decision seemed practical at the time since each group was reading a different book whereas Emily’s students had this common text/book).    It was truly fascinating to  see them make their way around to each table; many also revisited tables to do follow-up responses other peers might have left.  Consequently, we saw more of a trajectory in the written conversations that reflected more of a dialogue between various students.
  • Out of three classes, there were only two students I observed who seemed to struggle with full engagement.  I was honestly struck by how focused and intent students seemed during the quiet write-around piece of the activity.  There was definitely a synergy of thought that was truly awe-inspiring to just stand back and watch.

These differences in my mind are not “bad” or “good”,  but in many ways reflect not just the difference in scaffolding, but to a larger degree, the fact that Emily’s students as a whole have had more opportunities in their past K-9 experiences to engage in group or collaborative activities.  Students who are tracked into what are considered “lower” level courses are often confined to write5solitary activities involving worksheets and silence; hence, when they are given the opportunity to do more interactive and collaborative work, teachers have to be patient in helping students work through the learning curve students experience as they learn the social and academic skills they need for these kinds of participatory learning experiences.   I am thankful for teachers like Darryl who want to disrupt that norm and give these students the same kinds of learning opportunities as “Honors” or other “higher” level classes.

We then gave students time to debrief and process in small groups when the 20 minutes was up.   We told them they could talk about one or more of the following:

  • The written conversations and specific pieces of those conversations on the butcher paper at their table
  • Ideas and conversations they had read at other tables
  • New insights, questions, or understandings from the process of reading others’ ideas

Each group appointed a recorder to capture the “big ideas” from the small group discussions that lasted about 5-7 minutes.  Emily and I walked about and listened in to each group; Emily used what she heard to help lead the big group discussion we then had the last 10 minutes of class, a time in which they tied together both ideas as well as literary aspects of the text that were highlighted in student written conversations.

Every class had an overwhelmingly positive response to the activity.   There was even a class in which students remarked aloud to both Emily and me that “we should be doing this more often!”  At the end of class, students shared what they liked about the write around text on text activity while asking ( very enthusiastically) if this was something they could do more regularly!   Other feedback from the students:

  • They enjoyed and appreciated hearing many student voices, something that sometimes gets silenced in traditional class discussions.
  • They liked being able to see different perspectives on their book; several remarked how the written conversations helped them see something they had not noticed about the book.  Others commented their perspective on a character or issue in the text had changed after reading the opinions and responses of their peers.  They were beginning to understand learning is social and how meaning can be constructed together.
  • Students liked the freedom in being able to move about and respond at their own pace during the write-around.
  • Students were focused on ideas, not grammar or spelling.
  • Everyone had opportunities to contribute to the discussion.
  • Students remarked that this activity was one that helped them think more critically and deeply.
  • Students were surprised by how fast the period seemed to go and that they had written as long as they did.
  • Some students remarked they loved the “freedom” of the space of the media center and being able to participate in the activity without feeling “confined” by the space constraints and seating arrangements of the traditional classroom (a point which we feel supports our vision of transforming our library into a learning studio for teachers and students!).

write3As I have reflected now on this second effort and experience of doing written conversations with students, a few thoughts have resonated with me over the weekend:

  • Activities that put inquiry and participation at the heart of the learner experience are the ones that will truly capture students’ minds and trust.  Sometimes this involves using technology; sometimes it does not.
  • Over the course of Media 21, Susan and I became more selective and strategic about our incorporation of technology as a medium or tool for learning; we saw that students often needed the “offline” experience of learning how to participate in a community of learners in a space that was not so public online and provided immediate, face to face feedback.  These experiences so far at NHS seem to parallel those with Creekview students.
  • These kinds of conversations that don’t involve technology or dialogue in an online space can be a scaffold for more public conversations; however, I increasingly worry about the fine line in not imposing a medium for learning that might not work for teen learners vs. how to respectfully their comfort level and skill in participating in virtual learning spaces.  I plan to revisit Shall We Play?, an outstanding document that addresses this very challenge of helping students cultivate new media literacies and the four Cs of participation.  I think their pedagogical model of scaffolding those 4Cs in both low-tech and high-tech contexts will help me better think how to negotiate these questions and challenges as we hope to expand our work with teachers and students to grow these conversations.
  • These questions and reflections in these excellent posts from Lee Skallerup (It’s About Class:  Interrogating the Digital Divide) and Jackie Gerstein (Is There a Digital Divide or an Intellectual-Pedagogical One?) also reflect my thinking and work from the trenches.  These are definitely worth your time to read and to ponder as I worry that schools and libraries are doing a lot of shallow pedagogical work just for the sake of saying they are “integrating technology” and embracing “digital learning” (what the heck do we even mean by that?).  I fear the emphasis on “technology integration” is trumping sound, thoughtful instructional design in too many classrooms and libraries.

I hope to do a follow-up post in the next ten days or so to share our findings of coding the student work.  For now, though, I hope that this post will be helpful to those interested in these strategies.    This past Friday was one of those magical days with students and teachers in which you get to watch learning in action–watching ideas blossom like a bud unfurling its petals still evokes pure joy after 21 years of teaching.  In a climate in which high stakes testing increasingly informs the experience of school and undercuts teachers’ autonomy in determining the most effective ways their students learn, I’m grateful for teachers like Emily and Darryl who put their students’ needs first and are willing to give them time, space, and opportunities to be active agents in their experiences as learners.   If you’d like to see more scenes from Friday, please visit my photo set housed here.  In addition, here are two videos (I promise to film from the horizontal perspective next time!) from Friday:

Post Semester 1: Media 21 Students Reflect on Digital Composition and Participatory Learning

In November and December, I wrote two rather lengthy reflective posts about efforts to help students take a more explicit inquiry driven, participatory stance on literacy and learning as well as digital composition; these were preceded by an October post about the use of the Fishbowl approach to giving students more ownership of class conversation and for developing their own lines of questions/inquiries/points for exploration with peers.

This unit of study, which began with our book tasting in September 2011, was an extended inquiry into student selected issues that included child soldiers, treatment of women in the Middle East, immigration laws,  the impact of HIV/AIDS in Africa, racial profiling, fear and prejudice in a post 9/11 world, and genocide.  At the end of the semester, Susan Lester and I asked our students to reflect on their learning experiences with a series of questions and class time to compose their responses.  Embedded below is a summary of student responses and some additional questions (that piggyback on those from the December blog post) for next semester.    Susan and I are meeting this week together to brainstorm and explore the implications of this feedback as well as new strategies for learning and how to tweak some existing learning strategies; we’ll also meet  with our students in class this week to discuss the feedback and to invite student opinion on their ideas for addressing some of the challenges as well as celebrate the progress and accomplishments of first semester.  I’m excited to see how we can work together as a community of learners to build on our successes and find ways together to address some of the student identified challenges of these approaches to learning.

I’m interested in any thoughts or patterns you may notice, or if you are doing similar work, any ideas or insights you might have to share that will help all of us expand our thinking and improve the learning experiences we’re trying to create with our students.

Transliterate Libraries: Creating Conversations for Portable, Participatory, and Personalized Learning

I was extremely honored to present “Transliterate Libraries: Creating Conversations for Portable, Participatory, and Personalized Learning” yesterday at the 79th ABQLA Conference in Montreal (please see http://www.abqla.qc.ca/).  I am most grateful for this opportunity to share and learn with others as well as the incredible hospitality from everyone who participated in the conference—thank you for making me feel so welcome and for letting me learn from you.

Dr. Joanne de Groot, Leticia Cuenca, Buffy Hamilton

I thoroughly enjoyed hearing Dr. Michael Stephens’ morning keynote, Maria Savova’s presentation on McGill University’s ebook initiative, and Linda Hazzan’s inspiring session on Toronto Public Library’s Human Library  (also see this article), a program/initiative I hope to replicate. My only regret was that I had to miss seeing/hearing Amanda Etches-Johnson’s keynote so that I could catch my flight home!

If you’d like to learn more about the concepts in the slidedeck, please explore these resources:

Buffy Hamilton and Wendy Wayling

I want to give a special thanks to the conference committee as well as committee member Wendy Wayling of the Westmount Public Library for inviting me to the conference and for making me feel so welcome during my stay in Montreal; a heartfelt thank you also goes out to Babar Books, my session sponsor.  A heartfelt thank you also to Julie-Anne Cardella and her husband Pierre, Lora Baiocco, Leticia Cuenca, Lisa Milner, and Wendy Wayling for organizing our fun (and delicious!) dinner Wednesday evening—I am very happy to say I now the joys of fried goat cheese drizzled in honey and caramelized onions!

Igniting Conversations for Learning: Librarians Leading Professional Development

 

 

Probably the most cited reason I hear for attending conferences (both library and edtech) is, “I get to be with like-minded people.”   While this reason is fine and good and often inspiring and energizing, I personally leave these events more determined to make my own corner of the world one in which people are aspiring to be lifelong learners and to take risks whether they are classroom teachers, students, or librarians.  I think our ultimate goal should be to cultivate a culture of inquiry, curiosity, and conversation in our learning spaces.

Access to new hardware and access to information doesn’t mean that teachers and students automatically have buy-in to 21st century teaching and learning frameworks.  Asking people to critically interrogate their teaching philosophy and pedagogy is something that really should be at the forefront of technology integration because ultimately, the integration requires a significant shift away from teacher centered instruction.    I truly believe that conversations about learning are critical in order for teachers and students to rethink and question what we mean by “education”, “learning”, and “achievement.”

In our work as “instructional partners” and “leaders” in our learning communities, school librarians collaborate with teachers and students to help cultivate participation literacy and transliterate practices to facilitate learning experiences.    These collaborative efforts can become powerful grass-roots advocacy for meaningful change when other students and teachers take note of the kind of work their peers are engaging in with the assistance of the library program and librarian.

I’m excited to share that by request, I’ll be working with two of our departments this fall to provide half day professional development workshops in which we’ll explore:

  • How we can use Google Sites as a tool for instruction and information sharing as well as a medium for hosting content creation by both teachers and students? (Foreign Language Department, coming December 2010)
  • How can we tweak our research assignments to engage students in higher level questioning and exploration to minimize opportunities for plagiarism ( I think Jamie McKenzie refers this kind of “topical” research as scooping) and maximize students’ opportunities to think critically and inquire?  (Social Studies Department, TBA)

I’m also excited that my principal has given me the green light for my facilitating an additional professional development opportunity based loosely on the EdCamp concept. While I think the EdCamp concept is terrific, how powerful could it be to be host this in-house with your faculty and students as the experts leading the conversations as well as virtual guests from around the world who can also lead and join the conversation via Skype?  For many educators,  means for travel (personal and professional funds, professional leave time) is limited, so why not bring the experience to your local learning community in-house?

I’m still sketching out the details for this professional development with input from interested faculty and students, but I’m excited to help ignite this type of learning experience in my own school and for the library program to contribute to our learning community in a way that I think will have a direct and profound impact on teaching and learning in our building as we work together.

Inviting Participation with Illegal Art

Many thanks to colleague and fellow librarian Brian Mathews for pointing me to a super cool project, To Do, at his library, the University of California at Santa Barbara Library.  This project, a creation as a result of the collaboration between library staff, students, and Illegal Art, will be on display from September 20 until October 31.  What is the To Do project about?  The UCSB Library blog describes To Do :

Come see an interactive art installation that invites you to write down your own “to-do” lists and add to the collective consciousness of personal promises, social commitments and the yet to be done. The mural made entirely out of post-it notes will be on display on the first floor of the Davidson Library at UC Santa Barbara, across from the main elevators.

Illegal Art (www.illegalart.org) is a New York City based public art collective, whose goal is to create interactive public art to inspire self reflection, thought and human connection. Each piece is then presented or distributed in a manner in which participation is simple and
encouraged. For more information, on Illegal Art, visit, www.illegalart.org.

I think this is an original and unique way to invite patron participation and to create content that captures an aspect or snapshot of patron life and culture.  Kudos to librarian Lisa Koch who organized the installation of this project.  After viewing the photos from this library project as well as other projects facilitated by Illegal Art, I’m contemplating the possibilities for creating this type of participatory, cultural, and artistic project with my students at The Unquiet Library!  See other projects from Illegal Art by clicking here.