LibGuides Magic: Copying Content from One Guide to Another

One of my favorite features of LibGuides is the ease of copying over one piece of content you’ve created for a guide into another guide.   If you are constantly creating research guides/subject guides/research pathfinders like I am, this feature is a dealmaker.  See how it works in this video:

New Media Literacies Webinar on Multitasking Tonight

Come join us for a free webinar tonight on the new media literacy of multitasking hosted by the amazing people at the New Media Literacies Project.    Project NML defines the literacy of multitasking as:

the ability to scan one’s environment and shift focus as needed to salient details. Being a good multitasker is required in our new media landscape – and that includes learning when it isn’t good to multitask.

Here is a description of tonight’s webinar from Vanessa Vartabedian, New Media Literacies Community Manager:

Please join us this Thursday, September 23rd from 7-8:30 PM EST for this month’s webinar on the new media literacy multitasking. This session is centered around the debate of multitasking as a skill vs. distraction in relation to learning. It will provide an opportunity for participants to discuss the differences between multitasking, continuous partial attention, task-switching and the various other definitions that have come about to describe the ways in which we switch our attention from one thing to another faster and more frequently than ever. Whether you believe this can be a valuable skill in learning environments, or consider it a deterrent, one thing we know for sure is it’s not going away. Come contribute your experience, reflections and tips about this controversial skill in our 21st century classrooms, and explore how we might move beyond the debate and into useful practices.

This is the last in our series of webinars centered on specific NML skills. Next month on October 14th from 7-8:30 PM EST we will see each of the new media literacies in action as our Early Adopter Working Group of educators from the state of New Hampshire wrap-up a year-long professional development and share their reflections and expertise.  See the full schedule here.

Meet us in Elluminate:

Follow-up chat – Tuesday, Sept. 28th from 4-5 PM EST, also in Elluminate.

Learn more about new media literacies and why they are important in this terrific video overview:

Inviting Participation with Illegal Art

Many thanks to colleague and fellow librarian Brian Mathews for pointing me to a super cool project, To Do, at his library, the University of California at Santa Barbara Library.  This project, a creation as a result of the collaboration between library staff, students, and Illegal Art, will be on display from September 20 until October 31.  What is the To Do project about?  The UCSB Library blog describes To Do :

Come see an interactive art installation that invites you to write down your own “to-do” lists and add to the collective consciousness of personal promises, social commitments and the yet to be done. The mural made entirely out of post-it notes will be on display on the first floor of the Davidson Library at UC Santa Barbara, across from the main elevators.

Illegal Art ( is a New York City based public art collective, whose goal is to create interactive public art to inspire self reflection, thought and human connection. Each piece is then presented or distributed in a manner in which participation is simple and
encouraged. For more information, on Illegal Art, visit,

I think this is an original and unique way to invite patron participation and to create content that captures an aspect or snapshot of patron life and culture.  Kudos to librarian Lisa Koch who organized the installation of this project.  After viewing the photos from this library project as well as other projects facilitated by Illegal Art, I’m contemplating the possibilities for creating this type of participatory, cultural, and artistic project with my students at The Unquiet Library!  See other projects from Illegal Art by clicking here.

Free eBook and Lesson Plans: From the Creative Minds of 21st Century Librarians

Center for Digital Literacy via kwout

I’m very proud to have been one of the contributors to the Syracuse University Center for Digital Literacy e-book project, From the Creative Minds of 21st Century Librarians. Check out this free e-book that is available to everyone!  Here is a brief overview of the text:

From the Creative Minds of 21st Century Librarians is CDL’s first e-book project made possible in part through an IMLS grant awarded to CDL in 2008 to update the AASL standards in the S.O.S. for Information Literacy database. This 275-page free downloadable resource contains dozens of lesson plans that implement AASL’s Standards for the 21st-Century Learner in the context of the curriculum. Contributing authors include more than 30 teacher-librarians. The book, edited by Marilyn P. Arnone, Ruth V. Small, and Barbara K. Stripling, was more than a year in the making and features a foreword by Barbara Stripling and graphic design by Marguerite Chadwick-Juner. If you are looking for creative ideas that target the standards to implement in your school library, this book will help you jumpstart the process. Download the publication and please pass on this link to your colleagues in the school library field.