10th Grade English Students Take on the CRAAP Test Rumble

Earlier this week, I did a new twist on the write-around written conversation strategies by using it as a learning structure for students to evaluate different sources of information. This entry, originally posted today on my media center blog, shares our learning experience with the CRAAP Test Rumble!

Update 2/26/16:

By popular demand, here are the Word documents for the activity:

CRAAP Checklist Feb 2016

Small Group Response CRAAP Feb 16

The Hooch Learning Studio

Image created with Canva

Earlier this week, we had the great pleasure of working with Ms. Boudreaux and her two sections of Honors 10th Literature/Composition.  We used Monday to give students a hands-on experience in evaluating a variety of information sources.

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We began with a quick chat about the importance of evaluating and assessing allinformation sources in the context of one’s research task and topic, not just websites.    We then introduced the CRAAP test and showed a short video to familiarize students with the principles and questions to consider; students also received a CRAAP test checklist (see below).

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After the video, we explained to the students our hypothetical research task and topic (aligned with their actual assignment), and we reviewed the procedures for participating in our write-around, our learning structure for students looking at the different information sources and using the CRAAP test as our set of conversation prompts…

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14 thoughts on “10th Grade English Students Take on the CRAAP Test Rumble

  1. Would you be willing to share your CRAAP handout? Thank you!

    *Jennifer Sawyer* Library Media Tech San Luis Obispo High School

    On Wed, Feb 10, 2016 at 7:27 AM, The Unquiet Librarian wrote:

    > The Unquiet Librarian posted: “Earlier this week, I did a new twist on the > write-around written conversation strategies by using it as a learning > structure for students to evaluate different sources of information. This > entry, originally posted today on my media center blog, shares ou” >

  2. I love this lesson! Would you mind sharing a copy of your handouts? I have shared your post with teachers in my school and we would like to implement this strategy into out credible source instruction.

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