Slideshow: Hooch Learning Studio End of Year Annual Report

2015-16 Media Center Report-1 (2)

I’m very pleased to share with you all my end of year/annual report for the 2015-2016 year here at Chattahoochee High School.  As many of you know, I used Picktochart for my first ever midyear report, but I decided to go with Google Presentations/Slides for this end of year document.   The slideshow features instructional/programming highlights, important data points, and a glimpse of the future of our physical space (including an embedded video!) as well as the vision for our role in the Hooch Learning Community.  I created all my graphics with either Canva or PowerPoint.

Please enjoy the report in slideshow format!

turn the page

Midyear Media Center Report Fall 2015

For the last few weeks, I have contemplated doing a midyear/end of semester report.  While I have done monthly and yearly reports in the past, I have never done one at this point in the academic year.  However, I thought it would be a great reflective exercise for me as a school librarian in a new school and new district as well as a great way to share what has been happening with my administrative team.  My friend and former NHS colleague Jennifer Lund inspired me to use Piktochart after showing me her fabulous midyear report.  Here is my own rendition, which you can view by scrolling or in presentation view by clicking on the presentation icon in the upper right hand corner of the screen.

Hooch Learning Studio Fall 2015 Semester Report

Hooch Learning Studio Midyear Report 2015 - Piktochart Infographic Editor 2015-12-18 10-32-48

Knight Foundation and Monitor Institute Report: Connected Citizens: The Power, Potential and Peril of Networks

http://www.knightfoundation.org/publications/connected-citizens-power-potential-and-peril-netwo

Connected Citizens: The Power, Potential and Peril of Networks – Knight Foundation via kwout

A must read report for any librarian:

Rapid advances in digital media and technology are changing how we connect to information and each other. The way we engage in public dialogue, coordinate, solve problems—all of it is shifting. New networks are emerging everywhere. It’s exciting—and frightening. What is this new network-centric world? What does it mean for community change?