social networking

Crowdsourcing and Curating Collective Memory, Legends, and Local History with Facebook Groups

About two days ago, I noticed a flurry of postings from my local friends to a Facebook group called, “You’re Probably from Canton, GA (Cherokee County) If You Remember??” in which people were reminiscing about places, people, and traditions gone by in the local town and surrounding communities of Canton.   Out of curiosity, I began perusing the posts in the group this evening and am fascinated by the phenomenon I see happening here:  over 900 members are sharing collective memory, legends, lore, photographs, and remembrances of life in the past of Canton.

People are sharing musings and engaging in threaded conversations around historic photographs, school days, local events that no longer take place, “urban legends” (including one about one of my high school teachers, Miss Mauldin, who supposedly became distressed when she could not find her classroom after a group of mischievous teens pushed the lockers down the hall and concealed the entrance to her classroom), local figures, traditions, and cultural institutions of life in what used to a be fairly small north Georgia town.  Most of the memories center on life prior to the 1990s, a decade in which a population explosion changed the physical and cultural landscape of the community in many ways.

As I am browsing through the posts this evening, I can’t help but wonder what libraries and educators could take away from this kind of phenomenon of crowdsourcing collective memories; I’m intrigued what an ethnographer might also be able to take away from this collective narrative as well as individual narratives that are shared in this public space.

  • How can libraries and educators harness the power of social media to help people build a rich narrative?
  • Whose voices seem included and what groups might be absent from the conversation–and what might that in and of itself tell us about the culture of the community?
  • What can we learn from the stories that are shared in a medium like this and how could this be a medium for multiple voices telling the history, the story of a shared place?
  • Could we view this Facebook group as an alternative or emerging form of text?
  • What can we take away from this kind of narrative to inform our understanding of digital storytelling and digital composition?
  • Is Facebook a medium for curation, and if so, what are the benefits as well as challenges for using it as a curation medium?  How might libraries weave narratives from a group like this into a larger digital text using a tool like Storify?
  • What qualities engage and compel people to contribute to this conversation?  I saw numerous comments along the lines of, “This is fun!  I could do this all night!” or remarks about the number of hours people were devoting to sharing and reading the posts and comments in the group.   Clearly, people are experiencing flow in this learning and shared story space–how can libraries and educators tap into the power of shared storytelling and construction of local history/memory?
  • How is this group functioning as a site of participatory culture?
  • Do groups like this encourage people to use social media who may be reluctant to join a social network or who may not feel a sense of agency or desire to participate in social networking?
  • What motivates people to establish and engage in sustained participation in groups like these?

Media 21 Students Use Google Docs Discussions for Networked Learning During Presearch

Last Thursday, I showed our Media 21 students the new “discussions” feature in Google Docs since we’ve been using Google Docs extensively for collaborative writing and document sharing since last August.  After I introduced our presearching graphic organizer at the beginning of class today, one of our students decided to use the discussions feature with two of her classmates during presearch time today to share and discuss resources they were finding through the research pathfinder (accessible from our Media 21 Symbaloo webmix that students have pulled into their Symbaloo information dashboards).  Sydney and her two classmates were demonstrating AASL Standard for 21st Century Learners 3.1.2, “Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners” as they not only shared information sources, but also as they also used the discussion feature in their shared Google Document to have a conversation about the information they were finding in their sources.

I was so impressed by how Sydney applied the sharing skill in a new information seeking context that I asked her to share with others how she went about this task, and she graciously agreed to tell us about her brainstorm!

Howard Rheingold Keynote Speech: Social Media, Participative Pedagogy, and Digital Literacies

If you are familiar with my work and philosophy of librarianship, then you will understand how this wonderful speech so speaks to me.  I encourage you to take time to watch the video of this informative and inspiring talk by the one and only Howard Rheingold.

I especially enjoyed the section (right around the 38 minute mark)  of his keynote in which he outlines what he considers to be the five key literacies:

  1. attention literacy (fundamental)
  2. participation literacy
  3. cooperation and collaboration
  4. critical consumption (Crap detection)
  5. network awareness

According to Rheingold, these literacies work together and are connected, not separate.  Our focus should be keeping up with these literacies and to not get distracted by the technologies.  The power has shifted from the hardware, software, services  to the “know how” around these things.


Watch, Listen, Learn, and Think: Henry Jenkins and Michael Wesch

The TEDxNYED videos are now up on YouTube—this event featured a stellar lineup of innovative minds of relevance to all librarians and educators, but I want to spotlight two of my favorites here:  Henry Jenkins and Michael Wesch.   Wesch, a significant source of inspiration for me in the last year, and Henry Jenkins, of whom I’ve been a fan for nearly two years but whom I am now inhaling after participating in his free webinar last week (which you can watch here by accessing the archives page), are more than worth your time, so check out their talks from March 2010.


Google Social Search: A New Node in the Personal Learning Network

The announcement that Google Social Search is now available to everyone in beta was an exciting development I stumbled upon yesterday while  looking for web-based resources on courtly love to support the database and print materials in a research pathfinder I’m developing for two of my English teachers.

This new search feature represents what I think is the evolution of the web as mainstream websites and social media/social networking become more integrated in search results.   On a personal level, the integration of my social network associated with my Google Profile into a Google search gives me yet another seamless and powerful way of tapping into the collective knowledge of my personal learning network.  Now that the social media tools associated with the Google Profile of my colleagues are part of my Google search results, I can access information and materials (original or that from others) they are sharing and posting through the cloud.  Take a look at this sample search and results when I search for ipad.

What are the implications for the students I teach in the library?  The integration of Google tools has been a major push with ninth and tenth grade students this academic year.  I think this new search feature of Google will reinforce the idea of collaborative learning and knowledge construction as students can now “network” through their Google Profiles. This new search feature also presents the opportunity to underscore the importance of establishing a positive digital footprint and to expand our existing conversations about social scholarship.   As my Media 21 project gears up for an unofficial phase two on February 23, I am looking forward to integrating this new search feature into our “toolbox” of information seeking strategies;  I am also eager to show students the possibilities for sharing information sources through Google Profiles and Google Social Search.