2014 BCTLA Summer Institute Presentations and Resources

Teacher Librarians Engaging in Inquiry Through Written Conversations Around Texts

It was truly a pleasure earlier this week to spend time with the wonderful teacher librarians of BCTLA—-they are truly among the nicest, most enthusiastic, and most progressive groups of librarians I’ve had the honor to speak to in my career.  I am truly grateful for their hospitality, their energy, and their passionate participation during the Summer Institute this past Tuesday!  I’d like to give an extra word of thanks to Arlene Anderson—she was the ultimate hostess and went above and beyond the call of duty in making my visit both possible and memorable!

Fabulous Librarians of BCTLA!

Fabulous Librarians of BCTLA! /Photo by Doni Gratton

Session 1:  Subject Guides

Resources of Interest:

 

Session 2:  Participatory Learning and Inquiry

Please let me know if I have omitted any resources you may have wanted as a participant or if you want to share any work related to our sessions as the school year gets underway!

Growing Learning Communities Through School Libraries and Makerspaces-Creating, Constructing, Collaborating, Contributing

Thank you once again to Jennifer Finley-McGill, David Kates, and the Independent School Library Exchange of Southern California for inviting me to speak at their summer retreat in beautiful Ojai, California.  I am grateful for their hospitality as well as my friend and hostess Elisabeth Abarbanel for treating me to a great week of fun, learning, and sharing!  The slides below are from yesterday’s presentation about the possibilities for makerspaces and school libraries.  Please note all links referenced in the session are live and accessible via the SlideShare post below.

 

Framing and Developing an Inquiry Stance for Independent Research Projects

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A heartfelt thank you to The Thacher School Dean of Faculty Jeff Hooper and the wonderful participants of our workshop today on supporting students in independent research/capstone projects using strategies and models for inquiry. The first half of our workshop began with using the write around text on text strategy to help us explore and unpack our experiences, challenges, and successes with students and research projects.  We began by engaging in a write around these questions and data:

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This was the first time using this strategy with adult learners, and I was so impressed with the depth of thought, questions, participation, and engagement by the faculty in the workshop—they rocked! Take a look at their collaborative work in the gallery below or for a larger view of the photos, browse here in my Flickr album:

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Small Group Debrief and Large Group Share
See our collaborative Google Doc for our questions/wonderings, big ideas, and new ideas/insights that grew out of our 25 minute write-around.  We engaged in small group discussion and focused on these three areas of reflection that we all eventually contributed to a Google Doc to pull together our experience prior to the second half of our workshop which was a short presentation on models and strategies for inquiry that related to our questions, wonderings, and areas of challenge.

Presentation Slides/PDF

 

Resources of Interest

Librarians and Teachers as Instructional Partners: Written Conversations with Write Arounds Text on Text for Inquiry, Participation, and Social Construction of Meanings

Many thanks to the gracious librarians of ISLE for inviting me to join them for their summer retreat and for the opportunity to share the structure of writing around text on text for inquiry driven learning with students of all ages.  We had a wonderful hour of sharing, learning, and thinking about applications for this strategy for inquiry focused activities with our learners!

Resources of Interests

Thank you to Sarah Clark for her idea of using this structure for peer editing for creative and academic writing as well as Elisabeth Abarbanel for her suggestion of using this as  medium working with students and summer reading!

Rolling and Writing Collaborative Poetry with Verb Whiteboards

Rolling and writing with Verb whiteboards and easels

Rolling and writing with Verb whiteboards and easels

Yesterday my fellow librarian Jennifer Lund, Language Arts teacher Darrell Cicchetti, and I did a little impromptu planning to organize a fun end of the year celebration of the year-long “Independent Reading” initiative for Darrell’s 7th period 10th CP Language Arts students.  After some housekeeping business of checking each student’s library account for any outstanding books, we gave students a tour of new furniture arrivals(choices inspired by our colleagues at North Gwinnett High and Peachtree Ridge High and funded by grants from the Norcross High School Foundation as well as the GCPS Foundation) and let them try out the new seating.   The reaction was overwhelmingly positive—students loved both the color and comfort!

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We then asked students to sit in small groups at our regular tables and to do some spontaneous collaboration to craft a poem either about their independent reading choices from the past year or the current group read The Alchemist.   Some groups created mashup poems with each student writing a line about a character, theme, issue, or image from one of the IR choice books; others created acrostic poems using a character name from The Alchemist and crafting lines that related to some aspect of that text.   We provided dry erase markers to each student and groups used our new Verb whiteboards to draft their lines of poetry.

Collaborative Poetry Writing with Verb Whiteboards

Collaborative Poetry Writing and Sharing with Verb Whiteboards

When each group finished, they placed the whiteboard on our new Verb Easel.  Each group then had a volunteer who came up to read the poem and share with the large group.  All of us were not only pleasantly surprised with the quality of the poems students drafted in a short time, but we also relished the performance aspect students put into the reading of their poems.  One of the students, Gwenisha, quickly invented the hashtag #rollingandwriting at the beginning of our period, and it captured the spirit of our work for the period.

The experience of 7th period was an exciting glimpse of the collaborative work we hope to foster with teachers and students for 2014-2015 as our physical space redesign is in full swing to support our concept of library as learning studio to not only re-imagine our role at NHS but to also help impact pedagogy and the possibilities for learning for teachers and students together.

Related links of interest